Today we celebrate. It is the August 23!
And I’m a simple woman — you say celebration, i say sequins, unicorn brain farts, I’m Batman!
Okay, calm down.
It is my little brother’s birthday.

A few years ago, some cute weirdos from Dublin called us “Irish twins”.

The term, back in the day, was meant to be derogatory, sarcastic.

”Irish twins” the term is born, pun intended, in 19th’s century’s, strict, Catholic Great Britain and the U.S.

It was used for when two children are born to the same mother in the same calendar year or within 12 months of each other.

(My brother and I are 11 months apart).

Basically, by calling kiddos Irish twins, they subtitled:

Kahm, I *really* think your family is getting way, way bigger than you and your financies can handle, so, I don’t know, can you start using some sort of contraception, maybe, hehe?”

Anyway, August 23rd.
Number 23 is, arguably, one of the pop culture and science favorite (prime) number obsessions.
Here’s some of badass 23 facts:
  1. Each human parent contributes 23 chromosomes to the start of human life. The nuclei of cells in human bodies have 46 chromosomes made out of 23 pairs. Human sex cells, egg and sperm cells, both have 23 chromosomes which fuse and divide to create an cute little human life.
  2. The average human monthly physical biorhythm is 23 days (similar to menstrual cycle that, in average female, lasts 28 days
  3. 23 is the width of the Arecibo message, sent to space in search for extraterrestrial intelligence written by Frank Drake and Carl Sagan.
  4. John Forbes Nash, the Nobel Prize-winning economist — who you probably remember from the movie “A Beautiful Mind” (2001) — has some pretty shitty obsession with 23. It featured prominently in his battle with mental illness. His breakdown began when he claimed that a photograph of Pope John XXIII on the cover of Life magazine was in fact him, the proof being that 23 was his favorite number. Nash published 23 scientific articles and died on May 23 (three years ago, in 2015).
  5. The Ancient Chinese had weird connection with numbers. Among other things, they represented feminine sex with evens and odds for masculine. They considered prime numbers to be the most masculine, conferring special status on 23, which is made up of two consecutive prime numbers and the only even prime number — 2.
  6. The first morse code transmission — “What hath God wrought?” — was from the Bible paragraph “Numbers 23”. In telegraphers code 23 means “break the line”.
  7. The Birthday Paradox states that a group of 23 randomly-selected people is the smallest number where there will be a probability higher than 50 per cent that two people will share the same birthday. I know, this is stupid. Humans are a goddamn weirdos.
  8. “W” is the 23rd letter of the Latin alphabet. It has two points down and three points up. White supremacists use 23 to represent “W” as a mark of racial superiority.
  9. In the movie Airport (1970) the bomber has seat 23.
  10. The number of crosses on Calvary at the end of the Monty Python film, The Life of Brian, is 23.
  11. The lead characters in the Coen brothers’ film The Big Lebowski always used Lane 23 at the bowling alley.
  12. In the television series Lost, one of the combination of six numbers that haunt the characters and they have to input to a computer to avoid an unknown fate is 23.
  13. In Die Hard 3, a train derails in subway station .
  14. Sport stars have developed a particular affinity (and aversion) to 23. Michael Jordan, the American basketball player, wore the number throughout his career and inspired many copy cat fans of wardrobe vigintitriplicity (the principle of the Number 23). Best known is former England captain David Beckham, who swapped his number seven Manchester United jersey for number 23 when he joined Real Madrid.

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